A Study in Black and White

 

I bought a new dress to wear for a wedding tonight, it just needed the right accessory to make it look great. So this morning I pulled out one of my silk scarf blanks and mixed up a little Jet Black Jaquard Acid Dye in a jar with boiling water. I made a shibori “donut” by folding the scarf in half and rolling it around a piece of cotton twine on the diagonal. You then pull the  twine tightly and tie it to make a little silk donut.  Then I wet it and dunked it into the jar of dye.  After microwaving it on and off to keep it hot and stirring it with a chopstick, I added the vinegar to set the dye.  I microwaved it a little more, then rinsed well with synthopol and ironed it dry. In less than an hour, I had the perfect accessory!  Check out my Instagram feed, measuredthreads, for a few more photos.

All Wrapped Up

I’m getting ready to wind my warp for a workshop I am taking at the Weavers Guild of Greater Cincinnati.  Nationally renown weaver Rosalie Neilson (of rep weave fame) is conducting a workshop on block design and color with huck lace at the Guild house and it starts next week.  First I had to get my vintage but new-to-me 4 shaft, 4 treadle,  22″ Harrisville Designs loom ready for the workshop.  I wanted to use it rather than my Dorothy loom table loom since it has treadles.  The HD loom was a freebie from a neighbor of a friend who was cleaning out her basement. I was so excited to get it because I really like my bigger HD loom.  The “new” loom needed shaft cables and tie up cords replaced along with a good cleaning.  I also rearranged the direct tie up from 1, 2, 3, 4 on the treadles to 1, 3, 4, 2 so that I can “walk” the treadles while weaving.

I finished up the restoration yesterday and started to prepare my warp today.  I had to choose 4 colors, one is for a border to separate the blocks and the other three are the colors for the blocks.  We were instructed to make a wrap of our warp colors to see how they all went together. Making a wrap is a common part of design in weaving. I dithered a lot and finally settled on the colors I had originally been drawn to and wrapped them up. They are a bit bold aren’t they?  Now to wind the warp!

Tea (Towels) For Two

I got a new 20 inch Schacht Flip Rigid Heddle Loom! I have been wanting to design some color and weave tea towels for the rigid heddle loom. The 16 inch looms I own (an Ashford RH and a LeClerc Bergere) wouldn’t cut it for the size towel I wanted. As much as I love my little 10 inch Cricket looms (another well made Schacht product), I think the Flip is the best rh loom on the market when you want something a little bigger. Yesterday I put the loom together in about five minutes, and then finished designing and calculating the yarn needs for my project.I’m using two colors of 8/2 cotton in the warp and weft  I decided to direct warp the project. I put enough warp length on for two towels plus a little extra for sampling. Keeping the spools of yarn separated at the back of the loom on the floor keeps them from twisting around each other as I warp. Using 8/2 cotton will keep the towels from being too bulky and the great thing about the 8/2 Cotton is that two threads and each slot in hole of a 10 dent heddle works perfect at 20 e.p.i. for plain weave. I just direct warp, filling both the slots and the holes with one loop of thread following my color sequence for the pattern. (Using the IWeaveit app’s threading tracker made that a breeze).

To make direct warping easier for such a wide project, I did two things. I put my loom on a stand that was high enough so that I didn’t need to bend over as I was threading the heddle. Ergonomics in weaving are very important.  And rather than direct warping to one central peg, I used a small warping board clamped flat to a small table and used three pegs with a third of the warp to each peg. (See the first picture above). That will keep each warp end closer to the same length.  If I had using only one centrally placed peg, the warp ends would be longer at the outside edges of the warp than in the center of the warp since they would have a longer distance to travel. The warp only took about an hour and a half to measure and thread 360 ends (180 slots and holes). Since the holes are already threaded, when I wind on and tie onto the apron rod, I am ready to weave.

I did make one miscalculation while warping. I assumed my heddle was 20 inches wide since I bought a 20 inch wide weaving width loom. Since my warp was going to be 18 inches wide, I started threading one inch in from the edge of the heddle to center my warp (there should have been only one inch left un-threaded on the other side).  As you can see, it’s not centered. The heddle is actually 20 and 5/8 inches.  If I had checked before warping, I could’ve added another repeat of the color sequence and still not be weaving the full width of my loom. I think weaving from edge to edge the full width invites problems, so I like to leave at least two slots empty on either side of the warp. I will have to remember that tidbit for the next wide project I make. Now off to wind shuttles!

Value Contrasted

I have a beginning rigid heddle weaving class upcoming class at the Weavers Guild of Greater Cincinnati .  Learn to Weave a Hounstooth Scarf.  There is only one space left in the class.  This post is to help the new weavers pick their yarn for the class.  It will also help anyone who wants to make a color and weave effect in a project too.

The yarns chosen for class should be a worsted (medium or size 4) weight yarn to use in an 8 dent heddle or a bulky (size 5) weight yarn if you want to use a 5 dent heddle for faster weaving.  A wool or wool blend (or nice acrylic) is ideal.  For a nice size scarf you need one 100 gram ball of each color. Yarn should not be mohair or anything fuzzy or lumpy.  Avoid singles and get a plied yarn.  For a houndstooth you need 2 different colors that contrast in value.  One should be a dark color and one should be a light color to produce the best effect.  Colors that are close in value can look nice too, only the color and weave effect will be more subtle.

I like to take a digital photo and change it to monochrome (black and white) That will show you the difference in value of your yarn.

The photo above show some different yarns that are close in value.  When you change the color of the one on the left to black and white on the right, they are obviously almost the same in value and look like the same color in monochrome.

This photo above shows yarns that have a discernible difference in value. You can see in monochrome how much they differ.

Happy Weaving!

Roc the House

Roc Day

Wow, long time no post. I enjoyed the Weavers Guild sale and fall retreat in November, traveled to Savannah to visit my cousin in early December and then I have been teaching, creating, selling, helping my mom who broke her hip and have just plain been busy, especially over Christmas, with two of my kids being able to come home for the holidays (two still live at home too).  Now everyone is back to school and work and my mom is on the mend so its back to work for me.

The Weavers Guild held their annual Roc Day event last weekend.  Its a great benefit of membership.  The mini-classes are all free to members and you can take 2 in the day.  I learned how to weave on the bias on a pin loom and created a proddy flower using rug hooking techniques.  Both were fund and taught by creative fiber artists who are fellow guild members.

 

 

Fall into Socks

fallsock

I love the colors of these socks. They are the colors of Autumn to me. The yarn is slightly thicker, more of a sport weight than a fingering weight sock yarn and they are just the ticket for warm feet this winter. Want a pair?  Just $30 plus shipping and they also come in a colorway in shades of blue. Send me a message or use my store and I can custom make a pair for you.  (Some larger men’s sized will cost slightly more due to needing more than 100 g of yarn.) This pair is for a size US  8.5-9.5 woman’s shoe sized foot.  They were the first pair made on my 54 stitch cylinder and have a 2×1 rib stitch on the cuff and leg.  Look for these socks and more of my knitted items at the Weavers Guild of Greater Cincinnati Fall Sale,  November 11-13.  There will be many handmade items by the artisans of the Guild available to purchase!

 

 

Weaving Shibori

 

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In the Rigid Heddle Loom Study Group I lead at the Weavers Guild of Greater Cincinnati, we are working on a woven Shibori project. Last week we brought in our projects that we wove with supplemental weft. We got together to pull the supplemental weft threads to gather the woven cloth to create the areas of resist before dyeing. In the photo above I am pulling the blue supplemental threads along one side of the cloth.  I pulled them in small groups that match the block patterns I was weaving into the cloth.  Pull them about halfway across the cloth (be careful not to pull out the threads from the other side) and tie the small group of threads into and overhand knot. Finish one side before starting the other.

ws2  ws3

Next as you see in the above photos, I have started on the other side of the cloth.  To make it easier to tie the threads into the block groups again, I snip the loops of thread  as I come to them.

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Pull the group until the cloth gathers against the overhand knot tied on the other side.  Pull tightly and tie into a surgeons knot on this side (not and overhand like the other side).  If you break a thread by pulling too tightly that will just be a variation in the pattern in your finished cloth. Thensecure the surgeons knot with a second knot on top of it instead of finishing with a bow

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Above is the fully gathered cloth after I snipped off excess dangling threads.

Next up will be dyeing the gathered cloth in an indigo dye pot.

 

 

Silk, Shibori and Indigo

shibori silk scarves
Registration is now closed.  If you wish to plan a shibori silk scarf party for you and a group of 5-10, please contact me at this email and we can set it up!

I will be hosting a 4 hour beginner’s workshop in my yard in Silverton, Ohio Sunday September 18 at 1:00 pm on the art form of Shibori and indigo dyeing. Shibori is an ancient Japanese art in which cloth is bound, stitched, folded, twisted and/or compressed to create patterns in cloth before dyeing.

You will receive a blank silk scarf that is dye ready. We will learn Kumo, Kanko, and Itajime Shibori techniques to create patterns of resist for a beautiful and unique scarf. You will choose 1 or 2 techniques for your scarf, prepare it, dye it in the indigo pot, rinse it, iron it dry and take it home. No previous experience necessary!

Workshop is $35 and includes the scarf and materials needed for the resists, the use of the dye pot and a handout.

Indigo dyeing is wet and messy. Please bring a good pair of rubber gloves that has a long cuff (not stopping at the wrist) to keep the dye from leaking into the gloves. The indigo dye is a slightly alkaline solution and not harmful to most people but stains and can take up to a week to wear off. The more worried you are about blue hands, the better and longer your gloves should be. Wear old clothes and shoes that can get dye on them.

The address and directions to my home will be sent to you after registration.

Limit 10 participants. To register and pay, click “Add To Bag” below. (Registration is now closed and link to register has been removed.)

Cancellation policy 100% refund before September 14, no refund after September 14 unless your space can be filled.
Click here to email Nancy with questions or comments. MeasuredThreads

The Unknit

I spent the end of last week in Cape Girardau at the Erlbacher Knitting Machine Company Homecoming & Crank In.  I had a great time with friends I made last year and new friends I made this year, learned some great tips, and got some in person help on timing my ribber better.  One of the most helpful things I learned was how to unknit faster and better on the machine.  I had been doing it with my pick tool, lifting the stitches off one by one. I learned how to pull up on the yarn and the new stitch pops off and leaves the old stitch right where it should be.  I got pretty fast at it after a couple of times.  You need to raise needles in order to park the yarn carrier out of the way, but I usually have needles raised already because I am working on a heel or toe when the need arises to unknit.  Either I loose track of where I am and end up increasing where I should still be decreasing ( or vice versa) or I am not paying attention and keep decreasing past my target needle.  Well, the latter situation cam up this morning so I took a video while I unknit. A slotted yarn carrier is helpful so you don’t have to cut the yarn, but if you don’t have one, cut the yarn and you will need to make a join of some kind when you are ready to get back to knitting the yarn off the cone or bobbin. I have not come across this process on a video or Sock TV before, so here it is. It’s much easier to see it than to try to have it explained in words. I have the camera in front of me, so its a little awkward, and my hands get in the way a little.  Near the end, my camera angle is off, but you have seen the important stuff by then. If I need to to it again, I will try to take a better video next time.

 

WiPs and FOs

I finished a WiP (work in progress) yesterday, Hyrna með krónuprjóni is finally finished after 7 years (approximately 6.75 of those years it was in a bag).  Now it is a FO (finished object). I will submit it to my Weaver’s Guild UFOFF (unfinished objects finally finished) Challenge Exhibit in a week and it will be on display in the guild gallery for a while beginning in May.
Here is a pic of it before being blocked.

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After soaking in a little warm water and Eucalan wool wash, she needs to be shaped and pinned out to dry. I folded it in half for blocking to save space (along with my back–bending over and pinning it out takes a while) andto  keep the symmetry.

HMK Blocking

Wet blocking is a transformative process that softens the yarn, lets the stitches settle into place, stretches out and shapes and opens the lace. When it is fully dry and you unpin it, the shawl keeps it shape.

HMK close up blocking

Have I said how much I love Old Shale lace?

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Socks in progress.  The pink pair is waiting patiently to be removed from the machine and have the toes grafted closed.

Pink Socks

They will be part of the basket my study group is putting together for a raffle at the Weavers Guild of Greater Cincinnati for the Fiber Arts Fair we are having on April 30.  If you are interested in buying fiber art or making fiber art (members will be selling used equipment a tools and extra stash yarn) come to the Fair at the Guild House! I will have cowls, sock and some towels to sell.

I also finished up a pair of clogs for my 13 year old son. They were a collaborative effort.  I bought the yarn, my daughter did most of the knitting.  I finished the knitting, sewed them up and felted them. Here they are pictured with my size 8.5 foot.

Peters Clogs

He has outgrown two pairs (grown 8 inches in the last year), here is the first pair I knit Pair 1 and a post when I was working on his second pair. (for some reason I didn’t take a pic after they were finished) so the new ones are bigger than his size 10 feet to have a little growing room.

 

 

 

Get Your Crank On

There has been lots of discussion lately on the CSM forums about the learning curve in using a circular sock machine and the difference between user error as opposed to machine problems.  One way to minimize user error is to have a checklist of things to do when you are getting ready to stand or sit at the machine and make a pair of socks. It can help you eliminate some of those little things that go wrong.  I put together a list of things that I have been trying to do to keep my head in the game and minimize the problems I cause myself. There are lots of things to check and watch for, and if you miss one of them, you may have to start the sock over.

Here is my checklist to hang by the machine:
(You can pop it out by hovering over the top right hand corner of the Google doc and clicking on the square with the arrow.  Then print it or download to edit as you need to for your own way of working.)

Camo Socks

Camo socks
I have begun breaking in my 72 stitch cylinder and ribber dial and can now make nice men’s socks sized small (shoe size 8-9) and medium (shoe size 10-11). I knit these for my son in his favorite color green that is called “Camo”. His dad wants a pair now too, so it’s a good thing I have more of this yarn. I think they will be very popular! These socks have a 1×1 ribbed cuff and a 3×1 ribbed leg. I am working on a pair with a 2×2 ribbed cuff and leg. It requires a different type of cast on and I almost had it the other day, but when I took the ribber off, I saw that I had missed one stitch on the back half of the cylinder.

I may need to save up for a larger cylinder and ribber dial for large men’s socks, but will get some advice from the other crankers at the Crank in next month at the Cape on whether I should get the 80 or 84 stitch combination.

Do you like my sock stretchers?  I got them yesterday at the estate sale of a weaver.  There was quite a lot of yarn, books, and weaving tools, but I spotted these and snatched them up first thing.  They are vintage men’s stocking stretchers.  Before there was such as thing as  superwash yarn, the wool socks would shrink when washed and needed to be stretched out as they dried to maintain the size. (Since I use a superwash wool/nylon blend, I don’t have to worry about that, and they can even be machine washed on gentle.) I think they are a great way to feature my men’s socks and will look good when I get enough inventory to have a booth at a show.

CSM Ribbing Help

Flat Bent Tip NeedleI was working on a ribbed sock for my son today, and made a couple of videos to help other CSMers.

First, my new favorite tool, the flat, bent tip needle (Bodkin needle).

I would really like one about 2 inches longer, but haven’t found it yet.  This one is almost three inches long.  I use it to help when I am switching to my working yarn with the ribber in place on the my circular sock machine.  You need to thread the yarn into the machine and get it down into the cylinder to knit with it.  This needle is much easier for me to use than a latch hook tool that is fished up from below.  Check out my little video below.

 

Next is a video to show you how I latch up or “pick up” a dropped ribber stitch.   I had a lot of experience latching them up until I got my ribber correctly timed to the machine and the yarn guide placement adjusted correctly.  The only other videos I found about picking up stitches showed how to latch up a dropped cylinder stitch.  So this morning when I dropped a rib stitch when transferring it to the cylinder needle, I knew I would have a dropped stitch to fix when I took the ribber off.  So here it is.

Hyrna með krónuprjóni

My local weavers guild has started a member challenge called UnFinished Objects Finally Finished. (UFOFF). Last week I dug a shawl in its bag out of a box on my yarn storage shelves. No pattern or notes were with it. Today I located the book and made a copy of the chart and translation page for the instructions. A few years back I was in a lace shawl knitting phase.  I had finished a lovely shawl from a book called Þríhyrnur og langsjöl / or Three-cornered and long shawls by Sigridur Halldorsdottir. The book was in written in Icelandic but came with a translation of some of the text in the book. The patterns are all charted.

The first shawl I knit from the book was called Hyrna Herbogar and it was fun, but tricky.

HH 2nd blocking

For my second one, I chose a simpler pattern based on Old Shale lace called Hyrna Með Krónuprjóni (or HMK as it will be referred to from now on). Here is the photo from the book.  Mine will look different since I chose a striping sock yarn called Noro Kuryeon in natural colors.

HMK

Based on my project notes in Ravelry, I began working on HMK March 16, 2009 and sometime in May, 2009, put it down.  From the posts in the Three Cornered Knitters group on Ravelry it appears that I had figured out I was going to run out of yarn for the second time.  The post says I had 34% remaining to knit and only 32% of my total yarn remaining (checked by weighing it in grams on a digital scale before and during the knitting). Then there was also a post that said I traded some handmade soap for the some Kuryeon Sock color 149 that another Ravelry member had leftover when she finished her socks. The yarn came pretty quickly after the trade was negotiated, but I never picked HMK back up to start knitting again.

How did I know how far I was you ask? I am a geeky knitter and I like to make spreadsheets for shawl patterns to keep track of my yarn usage and percentage completed.

So to document how far the shawl was when I picked it back up to finish, here she is two weeks shy of 7 years after beginning.

IMG_0451 (Edited) IMG_0453 (Edited)Fortunately all my stitch markers were still in place. Based on the number of stitches in the first section of the chart, I figured out I was on row 13 of the 32 row repeat. Then I remembered the spread sheet and counted the total number of stitches on the needle to figure out the actual row I was on and it matched with that row of the repeat. It was a simple knit 3, purl to the last 3 stitches, knit 3.  Then I went on to row 14 on the chart and was a stitch off when I got to the center.  (The chart is only half the shawl, then you mirror it for the other half as you knit.) Fortunately the stitch markers helped me narrow down that the mistake was in the section closest to the center. I read my knitting, compared it to the chart, and figured out that about 6 stitches away from the center and 3 rows below, my needle had caught a strand and I had knit it as if it were a stitch, increasing by one stitch in that section.  It was an easy fix, I just dropped the unneeded stitch down the 3 rows to where I had caught it and can now knit on!  I have 168 stitches on the needle (started with 384) and I am on row 76 of 130 and 21,512 stitches out of 26,128 total to be knit therefore it is 82% complete.  Each row decreases as I knit, so it should go pretty quickly.  I will update my progress on Instagram if you’d like to follow.  #UFOFF

Mixed Warp Workshop Day 1

I’m taking a workshop on creating a mixed warp at the Weavers Guild of Greater Cincinnati. Today in the first 4 hours of the workshop, we learned a little about color theory and value. Colors may be different but have the same value on the grayscale. In our first group exercise we sorted yarns by value. Here is how they sorted out.

Sorted yarns in color

Here is the sorted yarn viewed as a grayscale image.

IMG_0302 (Edited)

Sometimes they can really fool you. Yellows and yarns that have some variegation or sparkle can be very difficult to sort. One of the theories of choosing the yarns is they can be any different colors but will look good together as long as they are about the same value.

Then you have to consider your fiber types, and textures of yarn and decide what will fibers will do taking into consideration how they will stretch in the warp and shrink in the finishing. We learned about the properties of different fibers such as wool, acrylic, silk, cotton and flax and how to decide how well they will mix together.

Then you choose something that will add a little “pop” of color or sparkle in the warp or to be used as a supplementary warp.

In my first go through in selecting 5 to 7 yarns from what I had to choose from, this is what I came up with and here is how they came out on the grayscale.my yarn gray

And here is what they look like in color.

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Its hard to see in a picture, but one of my yarns (the grayish one) had a little bit of silver sparkle to it.

After choosing some possibilities, we learned how to figure out the sett (how close together they should be) of yarns of different thicknesses, taking into consideration the percentage of each we will be using, the structure we will weave and the weft we are going to use. That part can be very tricky.

Tomorrow in an all day session we will lean different approaches to winding the warp and dressing the loom with a mixed warp. It should be a great day!

 

Cleveland Sucks Socks

Cleveland Socks
These Cleveland Browns Socks were a bit painful for me to knit as a die hard Cincinnati Bengals fan. But, my love for my son (also a die hard Bengals fan) outweighed my distaste for the Browns. His girlfriend is from the Cleveland area and is a Browns fan, and I wanted a Christmas gift to give to her. Fortunately, the Browns have had a dismal record this year and the Bengals beat them both times we played them or I might not have been able to overcome the loathing enough to do it. (Mom did say she put a curse on the socks to keep them from beating the Bengals in the future). They lost to Pittsburgh once this year, but maybe the socks will bring them the luck the need to beat the Squealers Steelers in their January 3 game. I actually hate Pittsburgh more, so sorry Juliann (my sister-in-law) there are no Steelers themed socks in your future.

Be Kind To Your Socks

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Now that I am selling more of my Measured Steps socks, I thought I would put up a post about caring for them.  I typically use high quality German sock yarns when I knit.  They are a superwash wool/nylon blend, which means that you can machine wash, gentle cycle and tumble dry on the lowest heat setting if you so desire.  But, I always recommend to hand wash, lay flat to dry or drape over a towel bar.  I use mild shampoo and lukewarm water, let them soak in the sink while I take a shower, rinse and squeeze out water, roll in a towel and press on it get out even more water.  An occasional rinse with hair conditioner is nice too.  If you lay them on a heat vent, they will dry overnight. You can wear them two times before washing if you let them air out between wearings.

They should not shrink appreciably in the washing machine and dryer if you follow the instructions from the yarn company, but there is abrasion in washer agitation and tumble drying which can cause the wool to pill and look worn sooner than if you hand washed your socks. If you insist on machine washing, turn them inside out and put them in a lingerie bag to keep them from rubbing and getting snagged on things. The good thing about the yarn is you won’t ruin your socks if they end up the the washer/dryer by accident, but if you treat them kindly you will keep them looking their best and lasting longer. I also recommend not walking around in your stocking feet in the house. Put some slippers on,e specially if you have rugs (friction again).  Keep your toenails trimmed to help keep the toes from wearing out.  Yes your socks will eventually wear out, but I usually get 3-4 years of frequent wear out of a pair of socks made with good quality sock yarn.

Friendly Socks

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Today I cranked a pair of socks for a friend.  I only had to start the first sock over once.  That is great progress considering I restarted the first sock 4 or 5 times  on my last pair. Of course I was trying to get my tension and number of rows for the foot correct so I was really sampling. I actually had two, perfectly made, complete socks that were ripped out, one too short for my foot and the other too long. I used the same tension settings today for these, but forgot the heel spring and I dropped a stitch in the ribbing that went all the way down so, since the ribbing was too loose, I just ripped and restarted. I adjusted the number of rounds I knit in the foot for a size 7.5 woman’s shoe. The yarn is unknown. My friend Karen lost the label so I have no idea of the fiber content, brand or care instructions. My guess though, is it’s  a superwash wool/nylon blend. It can probably be machine washed warm on gentle and tumbled dry on low, but all sock will last longer if treated a bit more gently by hand wash (I use shampoo) and laid flat to dry. If you are a cranker interested in the details, you can see them recorded in my projects on Ravelry.

Sock Hop

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I have started cranking out some socks again. Above is a pair I knit for me out of Berocco Sox Corib. Now I am working with my warm German sock yarns that you can see pictured below.  I bought some some collections, so they will have similar patterns within the collections, but different colorways. Some are very bright and some are more subdued and conservative. (Plus I have a new colorful collection of Opal Potpourri yarn on the way and will post those pics as soon as they arrive.)   If you want a particular size and colorway, let me know and you can choose from the sets below.  Normally $28 a pair but friends and family can order a pair for $25 (if paid by cash or check (ladies sizes) until the day before Thanksgiving, Wednesday November 25.  I can usually have them ready within a week but will let you know if they will take longer. Shipping is not included. Men’s sizes will take longer since I want to get the ladies sizes knit first. I need to switch out cylinders re-set the machine for a larger foot size. That all takes time and I prefer to knit as many as I can on one cylinder before switching it out.) Extra large men’s feet (above size 12) may cost more if I have to use more than one ball of yarn (in that case heels, toes and perhaps cuffs will need to be knit in a solid coordinating color which I have to buy). Send me a message through the contact form here or on my Measured Threads Facebook page if you want some. 

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Over the Rainbow Collection (numbered from the top row left to right as #1  to #4 &  bottom left to right as #5 to #8)

   

Hot Socks

Hot Socks Collection (numbered from the top row left to right as #1  to #3 &  bottom left to right as #4 to #6)

 

Morning Dew

Morning Dew Collection (numbered from the top row left to right as #1  to #4 &  bottom left to right as #5 to #8)

 

Fiber Arts Sale

IMAG3190I am selling some of my handmade items at the upcoming Fiber Arts Sale at the Weavers Guild of Greater Cincinnati.  The sale begins Friday, November 13 at 4 p.m. and continues on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday noon to 4 p.m. The work of many skilled artisans of the guild will be available to purchase for yourself or for Christmas gifts that show you care enough to give hand-made. My cowls that are pictured here are hand-knit with luxurious merino wool hand dyed in Uruguay by a family business (Malabrigo Yarn) that hires local women, uses environmentally friendly dyeing practices, and sources the wool from non-mulsed sheep that are shepherded in the hills of Uruguay. They are a warm and cushy fashion statement.  If you can’t make it to the sale, contact me about knitting one just for you!

Some of my indigo dyed, shibori style cotton napkins are also in the sale.  They are priced for sale in pairs so that you can make a set of 2, 4, 6 or more, and each napkin is unique.  Indigo is a classic color and shibori-inspired fashion and home decor items are really trending right now. They sure make a for snazzy table at a dinner party or just for you family meals.IMAG2998

I have a dye day coming up and can make more napkins, along with generously sized silk scarves that flatter everyone.

I also have submitted handwoven cotton and linen towels to the sale. The warp is ring spun natural cotton and the weft is a blue cotton/linen blend.  Each has a unique weaving pattern. They are individually priced, so you can buy one, two, or all four if you get there in time! Want to commission a set of towels for a gift? Contact me and I can make something similar to meet your needs.
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The Weavers Guild is located at 480 Gray Road, near Spring Grove Cemetery. I’ll be there from 4-8 p.m. on Friday evening.  Get there Friday if you want the best selection, there is always a line waiting to get in.